Bernedo

The afternoon’s blue sky smiles at me between the cumuli, enticing me to a bike ride. Where to? This time of the year, South is usually the safest course; so I dress the attire and, before I can realize, I’m going on two wheels on the road leading to the Earldom of Treviño, that piece of Burgos that got trapped between other districts of Álava. Noon passed a while ago and I don’t have much sun left. Shades start to stretch out on the asphalt when I get to Dulanto’s tavern, a must stop for a coffee to warm up my inside.

Stop at Dulanto's tavern, Burgos.
Stop at Dulanto’s tavern, Burgos.

I don’t really know whither I’m going. As often, I let myself be guided by whim: where I spot a village filling in my sight, perchance the tower of a church among the trees or a town napping on the fields, thither I’ll head my bike.
On a lowland to my left, highlighted against the greengray field under a lowering sun, the tiled roofs of Pariza tempt my fancy; but I let them behind: I feel like more road; I want to have some fun along the bends of the mountain pass.

Pariza, en el camino a Bernedo.
Pariza, on the way to Bernedo.

Eventually, past other Castilian villages, it’s the Basque region again and I find there what I’m looking for.
Six leagues away from Vitoria, at the northern foot of the mountains dividing Álava from Navarra, where the waters of the Ega and the Inglares join Castille, there lies the borough of Bernedo, headquarter as it was of the Basque Provinces by the end of XIXst century: a medieval bordering enclave, compulsory pass for merchants and travelers between Castille and the sea.

Tejados de Bernedo bajo la sierra de Cantabria.
Bernedo under the Sierra of Cantabria.

The Sierra of Cantabria, such is its name, overshadows the valley and draws its silhouette onto the hills north of the river. Beyond them, on the horizon, a layer of leaden clouds dyes the evening light with a tinge of blue and moist, of steel and granite.

Tejados de Bernedo a la luz azul de la tarde.
Roofs of Bernedo under the evening blueish light.

Riding very slowly I climb up the pine slope leading to the plaza, and I feel a dwarf under the impressive northern flank of the fortress-church that can’t hide its once defensive role.

Iglesia dedicada a la Natividad de Nª Señora.
Church of the Nativity of Our Lady.

I park Rosaura in the ample plaza, by the church’s portico and a row of lopped down trees, gnarled and stout. I look around: a few smoke columns of a blueish white outlining against the bare forest give away there’s life within the houses; but I can’t see a soul.

Plaza de Bernedo
Plaza of Bernedo

I walk round the church and get into the empty and shady narrow streets. The ancient origins of Bernedo go as far back as the Greeks settlers, who founded it with the name of Velia; and, as such, it’s listed under the cities of the juridical convention of Clunia. Many centuries later, unknown date, Bernedo would be built on Velia, and the first written instance of the new town found in History appears when, in year 1182, the king Sancho of Navarre, nicknamed the Wise, grants it the fuero de población, a status of borough, as he did with many other towns we’ve already visited. Also, alike those towns Bernedo is erected as walled stronghold, encircling three horizontal streets parallel to the hillsides, communicated by alleys and passageways, and towered by a castle (now reduced to ruins).

Traseras de la iglesia
Houses behind the church
Callejón entre dos de las calles principales
Alley between two of the main streets

A very unusual inscription on the facade of a centric, isolated house by the plaza calls my attention and makes me halt for some minutes. I read it over and over. “The house of Elojura won’t ever be short of misfortune. The curse of the mother roots out, burns and destroyes progeny and house.” It’s the first time I watch an accursed house. Which tragedy those words enclose? Which legend they drag? But there’s nobody around to ask, and I part unanswered.

Casa maldita de Bernedo
Accursed house in Bernedo

Along its history Bernedo had special favours and privileges, such as the banning of duels and common proofs of boiling water and red hot iron, as well as the exemption of customs duties; and, though the Navarre king Carlos II imposed on them a toll, the serfs appealed–successfully–to the king of Castille to intercede for them.

El consistorio de Bernedo
Bernedo’s townhall
Puerta la Sarrea desde intramuros
Sarrea gate as seen from outside the walls

My steps soon led me to Sarrea gate, the only remaining one out of three formerly existing in the wall encircling the town. I keep strolling outside, along the road to the chapel as it smootly climbs up the hillside, whence I can gain a fine view over the town. Now the sun only shines on the summits of the opposite ridges.

Bernedo desde la puerta Sarrea
Bernedo view from Sarrea gate.

It’s a tidied up and gathered up town, as most of the Basque towns are; nice houses well taken care of or restored, peaceful and cozy atmosphere even in such a cold winter evening as this. A town whose stones dream perhaps of past old glories, longing for their wall and their Castilian castle; stones maybe yearning their belonging to Navarre, though by the end of XIVth century Carlos III, king of Navarre, had already given to the Castilian Enrique II the tenure of the stronghold, who handed it over to the town’s majors.

Viejo granero extramuros de Bernedo
Old barn outside the walls.
Curioso balcón sin barandal.
Bizarre balcony without balustrade.

But it was only by the end of XVst century when Bernedo definitely passed to the kingdom of Castille, and the lordship of the town was given to Pedro López de Ayala, the infamous Comunero; the same one who later on–as I already told in my visit to Salvatierra, being lord of this city, rose up against his king Carlos V stirring the war of the Communities, while don Diego Martínez de Álava was major of Bernedo. This one would manage to get for the town, from the king of Castille, the same privileges as those of Vitoria, capital city of the region. However, his villeins paid him ill willedly, as they captured his son and joined the king’s enemies in the aforementioned war. Once this was over, and the Comunero was defeated, the town was ruled again by Martínez de Álava’s kin.

Un umbral bien cuidado.
A random doorstep.
El pórtico de la iglesia de la Natividad, mirando hacia la plaza.
The portico of the Nativity church, facing the plaza.

My head swarming of helmets and swords, battlements and tolls, I turn round towards the plaza and its magnificent church. I glimpse a bunch of kids in the turn of a corner, and I go after them out of curiosity, but there’s no trace of them; I keep walking and come to a romantic nook where a drinking fountain admonishes, since one and a half centuries, a four tuppence fine for those who do laundry there.

Fuente bebedero, con su amenaza de multa.
Drinking fountain.

Before going back home I walk down to the road, where upon arrival I saw an open bar. It’s the only lively place in town. But it’s too late for a tapa, and I order instead a hot chocolate to warm up my body before riding Rosaura on the road, back to XXIst century.

Ochandiano

Plaza principal
Plaza principal de Ochandiano

Tras unos días de fríos nortes, el otoño ha hecho su impetuosa entrada en el valle y la montaña alavesa, pasando una paleta de ocres y sienas sobre la arboleda y la hojarasca. Después, un veranillo de San Martín acompañado de cálidos vientos del sur ha venido a mitigar los rigores climáticos, creando unas condiciones ideales para viajar en moto.
Uno de los rincones del pueblo.
Uno de los rincones del pueblo.

En esta ocasión escojo Ochandiano, un pueblo que ya ha llamado mi atención en otros viajes y al que se llega por una muy entretenida carretera de curvas medias. La ligera cazadora que venía utilizando durante el verano ya se queda escasa, y tengo que echar mano del tres cuartos. No obstante, aún puedo utilizar el casco jet, cuyo tiempo de uso se está alargando más de lo que creía. Ha sido una buena compra. Y allá voy. Primero, unos aburridos quilómetros de autovía que me sirven, eso sí, para calentar el bicilíndrico en línea de la F800, más bien frío al principio. Algunas rachas fuertes de viento azotan de través los cuatro carriles de la autovía y me empujan hacia el arcén. Luego me desvío por la carretera local, protegida del viento por los árboles, que ya van dejando caer su vestimenta de hojas sobre el asfalto y ponen una cálida nota amarilla y ocre sobre la cinta grisácea y fría. Cojo las curvas, heterogéneas en trazado y radio, en alegre y animada sucesión. Siempre alerta, eso sí, porque a la calzada no le sobra anchura, vienen algunos coches en sentido contrario y un error puede costarme una tonta caída.
portico
Vista de la calle principal desde el pórtico de la iglesia

Antes de darme cuenta estoy entrando ya en Ochandiano. Tal es, desde el s XII, el verdadero nombre del pueblo, aunque el actual gobierno autonómico lo rebautizó como Otxandio, que es una evolución fonética relativamente reciente y de popularidad desconocida. Etimológicamente, Ochandiano significa el lugar de ochoa handía (gran lobo).
Casa torre en ruinas. Al fondo, el campanario de la parroquia.
Casa torre en ruinas. Al fondo, el campanario de la parroquia.

Descabalgo de Rosaura en las traseras de la iglesia y doy comienzo a mi visita. La plaza principal, Nagusia, es de un romanticismo y una armonía singulares, toda en piedra, incluyendo la impresionante tapia del frontón; extensa y despejada, guardada por el elegante torreón de la parroquia de Santa Marina, flanqueada por viejas casas, por el soberbio edificio del ayuntamiento y por un cobertizo columnado, lugar de reunión los días de mal tiempo. Copudos y corpulentos árboles dan fresca sombra a unos bancos de granito que podrían, sin duda, contar cien historias de enamorados y otras tantas de peleas entre cuadrillas. Sólo afea a Nagusia un moderno e innecesario panel luminoso informativo.
El campanario de Santa Marina visto desde un callejón
El campanario de Santa Marina visto desde un callejón

En uno de los tablones junto al ayuntamiento leo alguna orgullosa frase sobre el origen y la pureza vascuence de Ochandiano, primera localidad de Vizcaya, entrada a un territorio histórico con fuerte identidad. Nace la villa, dice, en el s XIII a la vera del camino real que unía Castilla con los principales puertos del Cantábrico vascuence, y era la puerta entre las vertientes mediterránea y cantábrica de los montes de Urquiola. Debía ser por aquel entonces no más que una aldea de pastores semi nómadas vascos cuando fue fundada como villa y recibió la carta puebla del entonces Señor de Vizcaya, López Díaz de Haro, con objeto de poblarla y establecer un centro comercial y defensivo como otros muchos en aquella época.
Tipica balconada vasca
Tipica balconada vasca

Luego, durante casi toda su historia, Ochandiano perteneció al Señorío de Vizcaya, de modo que, al recaer tal título sobre Juan I de Castilla en 1379, la villa pasó a formar parte de la corona de Castilla y posteriormente la de España. Un caso más en que se pone en evidencia la falta de fundamento para la independencia de un territorio que ni lo ha sido nunca, ni ha tenido antes de ahora conciencia alguna de identidad nacional. En el mejor de los casos, la de haber pertenecido a otra corona tampco vascuence: la de Navarra.
Caserío en ruinas
Caserío en ruinas

Además de por su plaza, el pueblo me atrae por su trazado en tres calles paralelas norte-sur comunicadas por misteriosos y umbríos pasadizos y cantones, típico de esa época en esta tierra; y también por la armonía y el buen gusto de sus casas, por los recios muros de sus edificios y por ese aire aún algo medieval, tranquilo, de gente amable y sencilla.
Casas de la plaza
Casas de la plaza

Algunas rachas de viento arremolinan las hojas que los árboles han dejado caer. Apenas se ve gente. En el centro de Nagusiahay una fuente de agua fresca y borbotante, con cuatro caños y una imagen de Vulcano, símbolo de las fraguas que supusieron el auge económico de la villa durante la época preindustrial, y consecuencia de las cuales los montes de los alrededores se vieron seriamente deforestados, verificando así el destino de tantísimas sociedades que, por atender sólo a lo inmediato, han forjado (y nunca mejor dicho) su propio declive. Al llegar la mecanización de la industria, y habiendo quedado los montes depauperados, Ochandiano ya no pudo competir y muchos de sus maestros y artesanos se vieron obligados a emigrar. Hubo el pueblo de reconvertirse a la agricultura, con la consiguiente pérdida de riqueza.
Calle principal, con sus bares y tabernas
Calle Nagusia, con sus bares y tabernas

A Ochandiano, como es normal en Vasconia, no le faltan atractivos bares y tabernas, sobre todo a lo largo de la calle principal, Uribarrena. Tras haber explorado los varios rincones del pueblo y fotografiado sus primores, entro a una pequeña taberna en la plaza, de nombre Danoena, donde dos viejos hablan en español y apuran el clarete de sus copas. El camarero es otro viejo, parlanchín y amable, al que pido una copa de lo mismo y me explica: ‘se vende y se bebe muy bien, y no es caro.’ ¿Pero es de la tierra?-le pregunto. ‘¡Ah, eso no sé! Catalán creo que es.’ Sí, era un espumoso catalán. Ese hombre y sus clientes-me dije-no parecen estar muy afectados por el típico chovinismo, y tal vez les importe poco la identidad vasca. Al marcharme, me aconseja un restaurante donde se come bien y a buen precio. Me chocó que, al despedirnos, no me dijera agur, sino adiós. Definitivamente ese hombre no se cuidaba mucho de política.
El consistorio
El consistorio, incumpliendo la ley de banderas por dejadez del gobierno español.

Antes de ir a almorzar, no obstante, recalo en el bar vecino, una herriko-taberna de esas donde, según dicen, recaudan fondos para la causa de ETA. Pero no me importa. No soy tan fanático que eso me impida tomarme un vino. Pido un chacolí con un pincho. Bai, me dice el chaval. Un tipo también agradable, como casi todos en esta tierra. Lleva, eso sí, el uniforme look borroka: una especie de coletilla, pendientes y aspecto jipi. Habla con otros clientes jóvenes en vasco. El local está decorado todo él con motivos independentistas y de apoyo a ETA o a sus presos, que para el caso es lo mismo. El lugar está descuidado, y las moscas revolotean a placer sobre los pinchos. A la hora de pagarle, me dice el precio en español y las gracias en vascuence, más el inevitable agur.
Vista parcial de la plaza
Vista parcial y otoñal de la plaza

Es curioso -me digo- que sean los jóvenes, que no han vivido represión alguna ni conocido los tiempos de la dictadura, quienes más radicales se muestren. Supongo que será cosa del adoctrinamiento recibido. Al salir del bar veo a tres moras cruzando la plaza, disfrazadas con sus túnicas de colores. Esta región ha atraído a una inusitada invasión morisca, que llena las capitales y llega hasta el villorrio más remoto. Tendría gracia que se islamizara la región antes de que los vascos consigan la independencia que tanto ansían.
La reconquista marroquí de Vasconia
La reconquista marroquí de Vasconia

Ochandio está, según su propia publicidad, en plena ruta del vino y el pescado, así que al entrar al restaurante no me pienso dos veces las opciones del menú. Sopa de pescado y lubina a la plancha. Me atienden bien, con amabilidad. La comida es buena, pero el vino, de Rioja, habría servido para teñir de granate las aguas de un río.
La plaza desde la entrada norte. Parroquia de Santa Marina al fondo
La plaza desde la entrada norte. Parroquia de Santa Marina al fondo

El café lo tomo en otro bar, al extremo opuesto de la calle. Me atiende una joven guapa y simpatica, que habla en vasco con algún vecino. Me sirve un café muy aromático que tomo sentado a una de las mesas de fuera. El lugar y la atmósfera no tienen nada que envidiarle a los de esos bonitos y cuidados pueblos franceses. Viajar por aquí es un placer.
Fuente y monumento a las herrerías
Fuente de Vulcano

Un último paseo, unas últimas fotos, y vuelvo a donde tengo la moto aparcada. Me calo casco y guantes, cabalgo sobre Rosaura, arranco y emprendo el camino de regreso, disfrutando el paisaje y las curvas, los colores del otoño y el aroma a tierra mojada.
Tomando el sol del mediodía en un caserío abandonado
Echando una siesta al sol del mediodía en un caserío abandonado
Plaza principal
Nagusia square

After a few cold days, fall has hastily arrived to the valley and mountains of Álava, bestowing its palette of ochres and siennas upon the groves and the earth. Then, an Indian summer along with southernly winds is appeasing the climate harshness, bringing fitting conditions for riding a bike.
Uno de los rincones del pueblo.
One of the borough’s corners.

This time I pick Ochandiano, a borough that had already caught my eye during some other trip. The road leading there is quite entertaining, with an enjoyable series of bends. The light jacket I’ve been using so far for riding is, now, not warm enough, so I catch a three-quarter coat. But I still can use my jet helmet, good enough for this weather. And there I go!
First, a few boring miles on the freeway, good for nothing but warming up my F800’s twin cylinder. A few strong gusts swipe the four-laned road and pushes me to the shoulder. Then, I turn off to a local road, shelterd from the wind by the groves whose falling leaves decorate the grey asphalt with a nice note of yellow and ochre. I take the unpredictable bends in a swift and fun succession, but with due care: the road is not so wide, there is some traffic and a mistake could be fatal.
portico
Main street as seen from the church’s portico

Before I can realize the time, I’m already entering Ochandiano: such is its real name since XIIth century, though the regional government has changed it into Otxandio, which is but a recent fonetic evolution. Ethymologically, Ochandiano means the place of ochoa handía (big wolf in Basque).
Casa torre en ruinas. Al fondo, el campanario de la parroquia.
House-fortress. In the background, the church’s bell tower.

I dismount Rosaura at the church’s back and start scouting the village. Nagusia, its main square has a unique romantic harmony, all stone, spacious and open, watched by the elegant bell tower of Santa Marina church, lined by old houses, by the city hall palace, by the striking stone fronton and by a colonnaded lean-to. Tall stout trees shade a few granite benches that surely might tell us one hundred love stories and factions fights. Only the ugly, modern and unnecessary LED lit information board breaks the beauty of the square.
El campanario de Santa Marina visto desde un callejón
Santa Marina’s tower bell as seen from a lane.

On one of the boards near the city hall I read a proud sentence about the origin of Ochandiano and its pure Basque character, first borough of Biscay, gate to a historical territory. It was founded along the first half of XIIIth century, along the royal way connecting Castile with the main seaports in the Cantabric, right upon the pass through the Urquiola mountains. Before then, it must have been but a Basque shepherd’s small village, until López Díaz de Haro, Lord of Biscay, granted Ochandiano the privileges with the main goal, as was customary in those times, of populating it and establishing a defensive and commercial centre.
Tipica balconada vasca
Typical Basque balcony

Since then, and during most of it’s history, Ochandiano belonged to the Signiory of Biscay, and therefore to Castile since 1379, when king Juan Ist got the title of Señor de Vizcaya. One more example of the lack of foundations on the part of these land for claiming independence of territories which never had it, nor even the notion of being a nation in themselves.
Caserío en ruinas
Hamlet ruins

Besides the main square, I also feel attracted by this village’s street layout, typical in the region: three parallel streets running north-south and connected by misterious, gloomy alleys and passageways; by the harmony and good taste of its houses, by the sturdy walls, and by that almost medieval look, quiet atmosphere and its people’s kindness.
Casas de la plaza
Nagusia square houses

Every now and then a gust whirls vigorously the fallen leaves. There are very few people around. In the middle of the square there is a fountain with four pipes gushing cool fresh water, and sporting the image of Vulcan, who symbolizes the forges thanks to which the borough saw a time of pre-industrial economical splendour, at the expense of a severe deforestation in the surrounding mountains. Such is the doom of so many societies which, caring only about the inmediate future, are the origin of their own downfall. Upon arrival of the industrial mechanization, and lacking more wood for feeding the forges, Ochandiano could not compete, and many of its masters and craftsmen had to migrate. The village went back to agriculture, and therefore got poorer.
Calle principal, con sus bares y tabernas
Uribarrena street, with its row of bars and taverns.

Nowadays Ochandiano abounds, like most Basque towns, in nice bars and taverns, most of all along Uribarrena, the main street. So, once I’ve explored this village’s corners and taken some few pictures, I get into a small tavern where two old men, speaking Spanish, finish off their wine glasses. I ask the waiter, another talkative and kind old man, to be served a glass of the same wine. He explains: ‘it’s quite popular this wine, good and not expensive.’ But is it local?–I ask. ¡Oh!, I don’t know about that. I believe it’s from Catalonia.’ This old man and his customers don’t seem to care much about the Basque identity. Upon leaving the bar, he sees me off and points to a restaurant where, he says, I can eat well and affordable.
El consistorio
The city hall, showing only the Basque flag, thus contravening the law, neglected by central government.

Yet, before going for luch, I stop by a neighbouring bar, one of those so-called herriko-tabernas, where the money for the Basque cause and terrorism is collected, or so the story goes. I order a wine and a pincho. Bai, the waiter replies in Basque (means “yes”). He’s a fine dude, like most people here, sporting a rasta look, some piercings and a hippy look. He talks in basque to other youngsters. The whole premises are decorated with independence signs and symbols, supporting the terrorists. Flies freely swarm around the pinchos. When I ask the bill and pay, he tells the price in Spanish and thanks in Basque.
Vista parcial de la plaza
Main square’s parcial view

Funny -think I- that the most radicals are the youngsters, who never saw any repression nor knew dictatorship times. I guess it’s a matter of the indictrination they go through. When I go out, I see three moors clad in their colourful robes; obviously no tourists. This region has drawn a striking muslim invasion: cities are crammed-full of moors, and you find them even in the remotest village. This land will be eventually Islamized long before the Basques fulfill the cultural immersion they endeavour.
La reconquista marroquí de Vasconia
Basque country re-conquered by Morocco.

Ochandio stands right in the middle of a fish and wine route; so, when entering the restaurant, I already have in mind what I’m going to order: fish soup and grilled bass. The staff is kind and serviceable, food is good, but the wine… could have dyed a whole river.
La plaza desde la entrada norte. Parroquia de Santa Marina al fondo
Main square. Santa Marina paroch in the background.

For a coffe I go to yet another bar, in the other end of the street. A young, pretty and very nice waitress tends to me. She also talks in Basque with the locals, while serving me a very aromatic coffe. I drink it outside, sitting at one of the street tables. The place, the temperature and the atmosphere make me feel like in one of those beautiful and tidy French towns. Only cheaper and closer.
Fuente y monumento a las herrerías
Vulcan’s fountain.

A last walk, a few more shots, and I go back where Rosaura is waiting for me. Helmet, gloves, starter, and I take the way back home, enjoying the landscape, the road bends, the autumn colours and the sweet scent of wet earth.
Tomando el sol del mediodía en un caserío abandonado
Napping under the noon sun.

Vergara

Me resulta casi imposible pensar en Vergara sin evocar al instante la curiosa expresión con que Valle-Inclán solía aludir a los acontecimientos históricos que allí ocurrieron; expresión que, en mi fantasía, venía como envuelta en el misterio y formando parte de las ya misteriosas (por periféricas y secundarias) guerras carlistas. “La traición de Vergara”, decía el escritor. ¿Qué traición había sido esa? La suponía yo íntimamente ligada al pacto del mismo nombre, pero ¿a qué se refería exactamente Don Ramón? Y he de confesar que el aprendizaje in situ de la historia relacionada con tal ciudad ha sido lo que esta vez, más que el placer de darme un garbeo en moto, me ha impulsado a ponerme en marcha.

Vergara
Vergara

El día ha salido perfecto: cálido, soleado y con poco viento. Una maravilla para el motero. La carretera provincial hasta Escoriaza es una gozada de buen asfalto y ágiles curvas, idóneas para probar la destreza propia con cierto gusanillo en el estómago. Luego, al paso por las zonas industriales de Arechabaleta y Arrasate, la ruta se afea un poco. En tres cuartos de hora, casi sin darme cuenta, estoy ya cruzando el puente del Deva, y enseguida me planto en pleno centro de Vergara, frente al casco antiguo. Pasa ya del mediodía y va apretando un poco el sol, así que dejo la moto a la sombra y empiezo a caminar, guiado sólo por el mero capricho. Quiere la casualidad que lo primero que llame mi atención sea el escudo en esquina del sobrio palacio Irizar, precisamente donde en 1839 los generales Maroto y Espartero firmaron el famoso convenio que puso fin a la primera guerra carlista.
Escudo en esquina del palacio Irizar.
Escudo en esquina del palacio Irizar.

Siempre atraído por la solemne belleza de los edificios antiguos, me acerco hasta el palacio sin saber aún lo que representa y, encontrando abierta la recia puerta de doble hoja, traspaso su umbral. Me hallo en un amplio y fresco zaguán de añejo suelo empedrado y austeras paredes, que sólo alberga una mínima exposición con unos grandes murales en que se cuentan, de una parte, la historia del edificio y, de otra, junto a dos reproducciones tamaño natural de los generales Baldomero Espartero y Rafael Maroto, las circunstancias en las que tuvieron lugar el convenio y el abrazo de Vergara. Me adueño del último folleto informativo que queda en español (los ejemplares en vascuence se aburren en su cajetín, atestiguando un deseo político) y, según visito el resto de la ciudad, voy leyendo en él los acontecimientos que la hicieron famosa; aunque no sin dificultad, pues el folleto, al intentar conciliar el rigor histórico con el dogmatismo identitario, resulta tibio y poco didáctico.
Casa Irizar, donde se firmó el Convenio de Vergara.
Casa Irizar, donde se firmó el convenio.

A poco que doy unos pasos por las calles del casco viejo me veo en la amplia plaza del ayuntamiento, frente a cuyo blasonado edificio se levanta otro, uno de los más emblemáticos y de mayor relevancia histórica en la ciudad: el Real seminario, sede que fue de la Real sociedad vascongada de Amigos del país, y originalmente un colegio de la Compañía de Jesús. Al ser expulsados los jesuitas de España, la Sociedad pidió gracia al rey para utilizar el edificio, y le fue concedida.
Ayuntamiento, con infinidad de banderas para disimular la presencia de la española.
Ayuntamiento, con muchas banderas para camuflar la española. Por detrás asoma la torre de la Iglesia.

Esto ocurría en la época de mayor auge económico de la villa, una vez que cesaron las escabechinas en que, durante dos siglos, se habían enfrentado sus familias y barrios rivales. Con la paz, vino la prosperidad a Vergara entre los ss XVI y XVIII, primero como mercado agrario, luego como enclave industrial ligado al hierro y, posteriormente, a partir de la creación de la mentada Sociedad, también como centro cultural. Fue durante esa época de relativo esplendor cuando en el Real seminario se descubriría el wolframio.
Real Seminario. Actualmente es sede de la U.N.E.D.
Real Seminario. Actualmente es sede de la U.N.E.D.

Justo detrás del ayuntamiento se yergue, majestuosa y recia, la parroquia de San Pedro de Ariznoa, de antiquísimos orígenes y verdadero embrión de la población de Vergara. En efecto, poco más que una ermita con ese nombre debió existir en estas tierras antes de que Alfonso X, en 1268, dispusiera la creación de la villa “a fuero de Vitoria”, llamándola Villanueva de Vergara. Así reza el documento:
“…Que habemos de facer una puebla en Vergara, e señaladamente en aquel logar que dicen Ariznoa; a que ponemos nombre Villanueva, e por facer bien e merced a los pobladores que agora son e seran daqui adelante, damosles e otorgamosles el fuero que han los de Vitoria.”
A este fuero sucesivos reyes añadirían otros privilegios con el interés de que la villa se poblase mejor.
Por tanto, a semejanza de otras localidades vascas de mediana importancia, Vergara nace en el seno de Castilla y sólo a esta corona (salvo después a la española) ha pertenecido en la historia. No hay, pues, fundamento alguno para su inclusión en territorios que hoy reclaman la independencia histórica. (Es de señalar, por cierto, que Vergara siempre se escribió así: con uve, y que el actual nombre oficial Bergara, con be, no puede responder más que a una artificial “euskaldunización” -si se me permite la palabra- de corte político.)
Parroquia de San Pedro de Ariznoa, embrión de Vergara.
Parroquia de San Pedro de Ariznoa, embrión de Vergara.

Observo la iglesia y, pese a la elegancia de su relativamente moderna fachada sur, escudo nobiliario incluido, me gusta bastante más su pórtico lateral oeste -otrora entrada principal- con ese romántico aire medieval que le confieren las sombras, las columnas de madera y los peldaños desgastados; pero más aún me atrae, cuando doblo la esquina con curiosidad infantil, el estrecho, húmedo y frío callejón porticado del flanco norte; y al caminar una docena de metros a lo largo de su pared hay una puerta abierta al interior de la parroquia, que aparece por completo sumida en las tinieblas. Una abertura que parece absorberme con una fuerza que no puedo resistir.
Pórtico oeste de la parroquia de San Pedro.
Pórtico oeste de la parroquia de San Pedro.

Sigiloso y obediente, entro en la iglesia con reverencia y expectante curiosidad, como quien traspasa el umbral hacia otro mundo. Me hallo sumergido en una total oscuridad que mi vista tarda unos segundos en comenzar a penetrar. Cuando las tinieblas se aclaran un poco, veo que estoy junto en una nave lateral de la iglesia, paralela a la central. A mi izquierda, un rectángulo lechoso en la oscuridad denuncia la existencia de una puerta medio entornada; quizá hacia la sacristía. Frente a mí, la nave principal aparece inmersa en una difusa luz grisácea, muy tenue, cuyo origen no puedo precisar. A mi derecha, resguardados de esta mínima claridad por el suelo del coro y  por los gruesos pilares del edificio, hay unos bancos sumidos en la mayor de las penumbras. Con gran lentitud, voy buscando mi camino a tientas para sentarme en uno de ellos; y la madera, al sentir mi peso, emite un pequeño crujido que resuena en el silencio absoluto.
¿Absoluto? No tanto. A medida que mis ojos y oídos se acostumbran a esta oscuridad y quietud empiezo a percibir un tenue murmullo y unos levísimos susurros ocasionales. Veo unas formas silentes moverse en las sombras y, frente al altar, un cuerpo arrodillado, cubierto por un hábito, que de vez en tanto hace una reverencia. De ahí provienen los murmullos. ¿Y los susurros? Son el frufrú de los hábitos que visten unos seres con apariencia angelical, que se desplazan sin apenas rozar el suelo, sin ruido de pasos, y que evolucionan por la iglesia con movimientos que parecen estar guiados por hilos desde las altas bóvedas. Aparecen o desaparecen por la puerta de la sacristía haciendo labores varias en completo silencio, cambian las flores del altar, limpian el polvo del retablo, llenan de agua los benditarios. O entran y salen por la misma puerta que utilicé yo. Me siento como si fuera un viajero en el tiempo observando desde una burbuja invisible las escenas del pasado. Una de esas formas levanta su rostro hacia mí y parece mirarme, como si pudiera traspasar la opacidad de la negrura a mi alrededor. Es una mujer joven, grácil, quizá incluso hermosa. Luego continúa su cometido, cualquiera que sea.
Permanezco ahí largo rato, disfrutando de un sosiego espiritual, sintiéndome a salvo de los peligros y las preocupaciones del mundo exterior. Es como haber entrado en un lugar encantado, donde habitan la paz, el silencio y las sombras. Me parece formar parte de ese lugar, estar  integrado en la madera y la piedra. Una experiencia casi mística.
Cuando salgo hacia la luz y hacia la vida, un impulso me hace seguir la pista de una de las religiosas. Por el camino me cruzo con otra, también joven, que me  lanza una fugaz mirada con una leve sonrisa en los labios. Los pasos de aquélla me llevan hasta la puerta del vecino y secular monasterio de la Santísima Trinidad. Son hermanas Clarisas; o quizá sólo beatas
Monasterio de la Santísima Trinidad. Clarisas.
Monasterio de la Santísima Trinidad. Clarisas.

Un exhaustivo recorrido por las callejuelas del casco viejo me brinda la ocasión de contemplar una abundancia de casas nobles, blasonadas, elegantes e incluso suntuosas, que atestiguan la eficacia que, para poblar la villa, tuvo la concesión de privilegios a los “fijosdalgo” que en ella se estableciesen.

A diferencia de otras fundadas en la misma época del medievo, con idénticos objetivos de afianzar fronteras y expandir el comercio, Vergara no fue amurallada; lo que no significa que fuese un ejemplo de paz, ya que durante los ss XIV y XV se libraron en sus calles las batallas de una continua contienda entre bandos, integrados por los distintos barrios o aldeas que la componían, y continuación en buena medida de las rivalidades ancestrales entre las familias Ozaeta y Gabiria.
Con la energía de un chaval que explora por vez primera un castillo, subo las empinadas cuestas que, detrás de la ciudad, llevan hasta el antiguo convento de la Soledad, desde donde se dominan los tejados de toda la villa y el cauce del Deva. Frente al convento hay un parche de hierba y un frondoso árbol de fresca sombra, bajo cuyas hojas descanso un rato del esfuerzo de la subida, porque chaval ya no soy. Es este un lugar idílico que, como tantos otros en el País Vasco, parece haber quedado trabado en los espinos del tiempo.
Antiguo convento de la Soledad.
Antiguo convento de la Soledad.

Desde aquí, bajo a la fresca y arbolada orilla del Deva, no sin echar un vistazo a Rosaura, que sigue intacta y a la sombra. Desde uno de los puentes del río se divisa, en contraste con el bosque de la ladera, la parroquia de Santa Marina, testigo del famoso abrazo entre los dos ejércitos combatientes.
Río Deva y parroquia de Santa Marina al fondo.
Río Deva y parroquia de Santa Marina al fondo.

Me encamino hacia allí, para hollar con mis propios pies el escenario de aquel encuentro… o de aquella traición.
En la primera mitad del s XIX la prosperidad que disfrutaba Vergara, reflejada en la abundancia y riqueza de sus palacios y edificios, se interrumpió al verse la villa involucrada en las guerras carlistas y ser escenario de algunos de sus principales acontecimientos. Cuenta la historia que, a la muerte de Fernando VII, la región se encontró dividida entre los liberales, partidarios de su viuda la regente Cristina, y los carlistas, en apoyo de su hermano el príncipe Don Carlos. Fiel en una primera batalla al bando liberal, la Vergara no tardaría, sin embargo, en rendirse sin resistencia a los carlistas, quedando bajo el mando del general Maroto. Sin embargo, a medida que los liberales fueron avanzando en otros frentes y que las calamidades (hambre, enfermedades, inundaciones) se adueñaban del pueblo, empezó a plantearse la conveniencia de llegar a un acuerdo que pusiera fin a esa guerra fratricida y la miseria que acarreaba, de modo que se estableció el diálogo entre los generales de ambos ejércitos que batallaban en la región, y que finalmente acordaron el mentado pacto, en virtud del cual los carlistas rendían sus armas al general Espartero a condición de que la corona respetase sus fueros, que la regente quería abolir. Y este acuerdo, firmado en el palacio Irizar como queda dicho, fue sellado y escenificado públicamente con el abrazo de ambos generales a las afueras de la villa, junto a la iglesia de Santa Marina.
El Deva a su paso por el
El Deva a su paso por el “campo del abrazo”,que quedaría a la izquierda.

Tal es el acuerdo al que Valle-Inclán, o acaso sólo alguno de sus personajes, se refiere como la traición de Vergara, al entender que la causa carlista fue de esa forma traicionada. Queda por fin, gracias a esta visita, aclarada la incógnita que para mí encerraron durante años las palabras del escritor gallego, y disipado el simple misterio que contenían.
Cumplida la misión, ya sólo me resta volver. Pero antes, como es mi costumbre, busco un lugar agradable donde pedir vino y pincho. Lo encuentro en la casa de Aróstegui, donde devoro con fruición un sector de tortilla, sentado a una mesa bajo la sombra de un frondoso árbol. Esta vez, para variar, he pedido una pepacola. Desde donde estoy puedo ver la moto, que espera ser cabalgada pronto.
Palacio Laureaga.
Palacio Laureaga.

Hay, en el extremo oeste del campo del abrazo, un palacio llamado Laureaga, mandado construir en el s XVI por el linaje Izaguirre, quienes hicieron inscribir en la reja de una de sus ventanas la siguiente inscripción: “Ni la busques ni la temas”. Se refiere a la muerte. Sabio lema bajo el que vivir… si se es capaz de ello.I can hardly think of Vergara without at once evoking the strange expression used by Valle-Inclán–one of my favourite Spanish writers– to refer to the historical events that took place in such town. I used to think of these words as coming wrapped in some kind of mistery within the misterious Spanish side-wars called Carlistas. “The betrayal of Vergara”, wrote Valle-Inclán. What betrayal was that? I guessed it must be connected with the agreement of Vergara, but what did the writer exactly mean? Thus, this time I took a ride there for learning about those facts in situ, rather than for just the pleasure of riding.
Vergara
The village of Vergara

Besides, the day comes perfect for the motorcycle: warm, sunny and not windy. Wonderful for a biker. The first half of the ride, until Escoriaza, goes on a pleasurable pavement and along fun bends, great for testing one’s ability; but the second half isn’t that nice, running through the industrial areas of Arechabaleta and Arrasate.
Before almost realizing it, I’m already crossing over the Deva river and arriving to the city centre of Vergara, right by the old town. It’s past noon, and becoming a bit hot. I park Rosaura well in the shade and start a stroll along the town. By pure chance, the first thing calling my attention is the corner-crest of the sober Irizar palace, precisely the house where generals Maroto and Espartero signed the famous agreement which, in 1839, ended the first Carlista war.
Escudo en esquina del palacio Irizar.
Corner-crest on Irizar palace.

But supposedly I still don’t know about that; so, I walk to the palace attracted, as usual, by the solemn beauty of ancient buildings. The double-leaf gate is open, and across it there is a smal yard, cobbled, holding a succint exhibition where the history of the building is told on big posters, and the circumstances under which the agreement and the embrace of Vergara took place are explained. I pick the last brochure in Spanish (the copies in Basque sleep in their box, evidencing that a bilingual Basque country is more a wish than a reality) and, while sauntering along the borough, I read the events that made a historical landmark of it. Tough task, though, as the brochure tries to harmonize historical accuracy and independentist dogmatism, thus being tepid and barely informative.
Casa Irizar, donde se firmó el Convenio de Vergara.
Irizar palace, where the agreement was signed.

A couple of blocks further, I run into a wide square having on one side the excessively emblazoned city hall and, on the other, one of Vergara’s most important and historically relevant buildings: the Royal seminar, seat of the Royal Basque society of friends of the land, formerly a school belonging to the religious order Compañía de Jesús, thrown out from Spain by the king.
Ayuntamiento, con infinidad de banderas para disimular la presencia de la española.
City hall, showing many flags for cloaking the Spanish one. Behind it, the church bell tower.

Thi seminar was founded during the splendour of Vergara, after the end of the struggles which, for two centuries, upheaved the town, having confronted rival families and neighbourhoods. Along with the peace, prosperity came and stayed between XVIth and XVIIIth centuries, firstly as an agricultural market, then as an industrial settlement and, finally, thanks to the seminar, as a cultural centre. It was here where the chemical element Wolframium was discovered.
Real Seminario. Actualmente es sede de la U.N.E.D.
Royal seminar. Presently seat of a University.

Right behind the city hall stands, majestic and sturdy, the ancient parish of San Pedro de Ariznoa, the real germ of Vergara. Indeed, little more than a chapel must have existed in these whereabouts before Alfonso X, in the year 1268, decreed the foundation of a borough, with privileges alike those of Vitoria and named Villanueva (of Vergara). Thus reads the document:
…We must create a borough in Vergara, namely in such a place called Ariznoa, and We name it Villanueva, and in order to do good and favour to the present and to-be settlers, we grant them the same privileges as those of Vitoria.”
Upcoming kings added new privileges to the borough for achieving a faster populating.
Thus, and like other Basque towns, Vergara was born under the rule of Castile, and to Castile only (except later to Spain) has it ever belonged along History. Therefore, there are no grounds whatsoever for being included in the territory that, today, claims their independence upon historical basis. (Mark, btw, that Vergara has always been written as such: with V, and that the present official name of Bergara, with B, has the sole political purpose of artificially “Basqu-izing” it.)
Parroquia de San Pedro de Ariznoa, embrión de Vergara.
Parish of San Pedro de Ariznoa, germ of Vergara.

I watch the parish from outside and, despite the elegance of its South facade, coat of arms and all, I like better its West side portico (once main entrance), with its romantic medieval look bestowed by the shades, the wood posts and the worn steps. Yet, I like even better the narrow, wet and cool porched alley of the North side. And walking along this side I find a by-door leading to the church’s gloomy inside.
Pórtico oeste de la parroquia de San Pedro.
San Pedro’s west portico.

Inside San Pedro of Ariznoa.
Such black opening seems to attract me with a force that I can’t resist. Obedient, full of curiosity and awe, I stealthily set foot inside the blackness as if crossing the threshold to another world. Once in, I face total darkness, which my eyes need some time to pierce through. When the thick shadows thin out a bit, I see that I’m within a side nave, only a few feet away from the main one. Some metres to my left, in the middle of the shapeless nothingness, there is the milky rectangle of a door ajar leading somewhere, maybe to the vestry. Right ahead of me, the main nave’s vault appears soaked in a dim greyish light, quite faint, whose origin I can’t tell. To my right, shielded from any light whatsoever by the choir’s floor above and one of the church’s thick pillars, there are a few benches submerged in the thickest blackness. Slowly and carefully, I grope my way along and sit on a bench. Upon feeling my weight, a creak of the wood fills in the utter silence.
¿Utter? Not quite. As my eyes and ears get used to this gloom and quietness, I start perceiving a faint, constant murmur and a some feeble chance whispers. Now and then, I see noiseless figures moving in the shade. In front of the altar, a kneeling body under a robe bowes once in a while. Thence the murmur. And the whispers? They’re the rustle of the habits of angelic-looking beings which go about barely touching the floor, apparently footstepsless, moving back and forth as puppets whose threads came down from up the dome. I see them getting in or out through the vestry door, and performing various tasks in complete silence: change the flowers, dust the altarpiece, fill in the holy water basins. Or they come in, or leave, through the same gate I used.
I feel as a time-traveler, watching scenes of the past from within an invisible bubble. Then, I fancy that one of those figures lifts her face and stares at me, as if she could pierce the blackness’ opacity whereof I’m wrapped up. She’s a young woman, graceful, maybe even pretty. Then she goes back to her job, whichever it is.
I remain sitting here for a while, enjoying a spiritual composure, safe from the dangers and worries of the outer world. It’s like if I had entered an enchanted place, where peace, silence and shadows dwell, and I feel part of such place, blended with the wood and the stone. An almost mystic experience.
When I come out to life and light, I try to follow the track of one of those angels. Along the way, I run into another one, which throws at me a quick glance and a faint smile. She’s also young. They can’t possibly be nuns. Maybe lay sisters? Nearby there is the ancient monastery of the Holy Trinity, where the Clarisas sisters abide.
Monastery of the Holy Trinity. Clarisas.
Monastery of the Holy Trinity. Clarisas.

A thorough tour along the old town’s streets gives me the chance of beholding plenty of noblemens’ emblazoned palaces, elegant and even luxurious, evidencing that the grant of privileges to the noblemen for settling in Vergara was quite effective for populating the village.

Unlike other medieval boroughs founded during the same time and with similar purposes (border strenghten and commerce expansion), Vergara was never walled up–which doesn’t mean it was a peaceful town: along XIVth and XVth, frays were fought continually on the streets out of a long faction war, held between districts and, oftentimes–like Shakespeare’s Capulets and Montagues–between families, namely the Ozaetas and the Gabirias.
With the energy of a kid visiting a castle for the first time, I climb up the steep backstreets which lead to the ancient Nunnery of La Soledad, from where you can look out over the whole village’s roofs and Deva’s riverbed. Right in front of the nunnery’s facade there is a grass patch under a leafy tree, where I take a little rest, as I’m no kid any more. What an idyllic place! Like many other in the Basque country, it seems to have got tangled in the thorns of time…
Antiguo convento de la Soledad.
Ancient nunnery of La Soledad.

Then, I go down from here to the cool and wooded Deva bank–first taking a look at Rosaura, who waits for me sound safe in the shade. From one of the Deva’s bridges I can see, contrasting with the woody background, the Santa Marina parish, witness of the famous embrace between the two confronted armies.
Río Deva y parroquia de Santa Marina al fondo.
Deva river and Santa Marina parish.

I head that way with the aim of treading with my own feet on that meeting’s–or that betrayal’s scene.
Indeed, during the first of XIXth century, Vergara’s prosperity, evidenced by the many rich palaces and buildings, was hampered when the town got involved in the Carlistas wars and became main scene for some of its events. History goes that, after Fernando the VIIth’s death, this region was split between liberals (supporting his regent widow Cristina) and the carlistas (backing up his brother, prince Carlos). Vergara was first loyal to the former, but soon surrendered to the latter without resistance, and passed under the command of General Maroto. However, as liberals were moving forward in other fronts and as hunger, disease, floods and other calamities fell upon Vergara, it was deemed convenient to reach some agreement to put an end to such fratricidal war. To this end, conversations started between both armies’ Generals, who finally agreed on the aforementioned agreement, hereby carlistas must reverse their weapons under condition that the Crown would respect their privileges, which the regent wanted to revoke. And this agreement, after having been signed in the Irizar palace as told, was publicly sealed and “dramatized” by both generals embracing each other on the outskirts of town, beside Santa Marina church.
El Deva a su paso por el
Deva river by the “field of embrace”, to the left.

And this is the pact to which Valle-Inclán, or maybe just one of his characters, refers to as the betrayal of Vergara, in the belief that the Carlista cause was thereby treasoned. So, thanks to this tour, the mystery has finally vanished around the writer’s words, for me. Mission accomplished, I needn’t but go back home. Not before having my customary drink and pincho in some pleasant bar, though. Aróstegui house is the place, where I wolf down the pincho de tortilla while drinking a coke sitting at a table under a leafy tree in the sleepy afternoon.
Palacio Laureaga.
Laureaga palace.

On the field of embrace’s West end stands a palace now owned by Laureaga lineage, but built by the Izaguirres during XVIth century, who set that on the bars of its lower window this inscription should be engraved: “Neither seek it nor dread it”; meaning death. Wise motto to live by, if you’re able to.

Salvatierra

[:es]

Leyenda junto a la puerta norte
Leyenda junto a la puerta norte

Nada más llegar a Salvatierra desde Zalduendo (descrita en mi anterior capítulo) y dejar la moto dentro del recinto amurallado, me topo con esta curiosa aunque algo confusa leyenda que se exhibe junto a la Iglesia de Santa María, cabe la puerta norte de la muralla; confusa por cuanto ambos acontecimientos (la integración de la puerta norte en el palacio de los Ayala y la pérdida del condado de Salvatierra por el comunero) sucedieron casi con un siglo de diferencia, y no todo el mundo ha de saber que el Don Pedro López de Ayala “comunero” del segundo párrafo es el nieto (en realidad, el tataranieto, según un amable lector nos dice en su comentario a esta entrada) del Pedro López de Ayala mencionado en el primero. Y es que varios fueron los Pedro López de Ayala que, sucediéndose unos a otros, señorearon la Villa de Salvatierra a lo largo de los ss XV y XVI. Así, con este pequeño rompecabezas por descifrar, comienzo mi exploración de la Leal Villa de Salvatierra.
Cada vez que visito uno de estos pueblos encuentro entretenido el ejercicio de imaginar su evolución, cómo se originó o en qué circunstancias fue fundado, y me gusta mirar con los ojos de la fantasía hacia el pasado, ensayando posibles escenas de su historia.
Si me remonto a los principios de nuestra era, s. I aC., veo a los romanos, en su avance por Hispania, encontrarse con un pequeño asentamiento de pastores euskaldunes en lo alto del otero que ahora ocupa Salvatierra. Estas tropas exploradoras informarían a Roma de lo que iban hallando, y años o décadas más tarde Roma hace pasar por aquí la calzada XXXIV ab asturica burdigalam para comunicar Astorga con Burdeos. Ya tenemos uno de los pilares para que Salvatierra fuese un lugar importante en el futuro. Hay vestigios de presencia romana en la zona hasta el s. V dC. Para entonces, esta región delimitaba la frontera entre el condado de Vasconia y la Hispania visigoda.
Vista desde Salvatierra hacia las sierra del Aratz.
Vista desde Salvatierra hacia la sierra de Urquilla y el monte Aratz.

Es posible, aunque no está claro, que sobre el asentamiento de pastores nómadas los reyes navarros fundasen en el año 824 una minúscula aldea con el nombre vasco de Hagurahin (lugar del adiós), que estuvo bajo el dominio de la corona de Navarra hasta que en el año 1200 Alfonso VIII de Castilla la conquista y la anexiona a su reinado. Y desde tan lejana fecha hasta nuestros días ha sido castellana de forma prácticamente ininterrumpida. Buscaba Castilla fortalecer sus fronteras y establecer caminos que comunicaran la Rioja con el Cantábrico, y, con esos fines, unas décadas tras anexionarse Hagurahin, concretamente en 1265, Alfonso X (el sabio) funda sobre dicha aldea una villa a la que bautiza con el nombre de Salvatierra, le concede el fuero de población y ordena que sea amurallada. Intramuros, se le conferirá el trazado característico de otras villas de la zona, como Antoñana, de tres calles paralelas orientadas de norte a sur y comunicadas por cantones, y con una iglesia-fortaleza en cada extremo. Debido a estas medidas, pronto la villa prosperaría y se convertiría en un estrátegico cruce de caminos: la vía este-oeste entre Navarra y Astorga, y la vía norte-sur entre la Rioja y el Cantábrico.
Iglesia fortaleza de San Martín, en el extremo sur del recinto amurallado.

Voy explorando el lugar guiado por los hitos de información histórica (escritos con un lamentable sesgo maniqueísta y antiespañol) distribuidos por los lugares más relevantes, y basándome en ellos puedo ir reconstruyendo los hechos y eventos que conformaron la historia de esta ciudad.
La calle Mayor, que comunica intramuros las puertas Norte y Sur.
La calle Mayor, que comunica intramuros las puertas Norte y Sur.

Uno de los cantones que comunican la calle Mayor con la calle XXX
Uno de los cantones que comunican la calle Mayor con la calle Zapatería-

Corría el año de 1367 cuando Salvatierra, bajo el reinado y dominación de Enrique de Trastámara, se vio invadida por un poderoso ejército del legítimo heredero al trono de Castilla, Pedro I (apodado “el cruel” por sus enemigos y “el justiciero” por sus seguidores); y llegaba acompañado por aliados ingleses (el afamado príncipe Negro, conde de Lancaster), gascones, franceses, navarros e incluso Jaime III de Mallorca. Ante tan numeroso ejército, la villa se rindió sin luchar. Y al morir Pedro I dos años después, su hijo Juan I de Castilla donó Salvatierra en mayorazgo al canciller Ayala, pasando luego en herencia a varios López de Ayala durante cuatro generaciones. Fue el nieto de este canciller, Don Pedro López de Ayala y primer conde de Salvatierra, el que protagonizó en 1440 los hechos que se narran en la leyenda de la primera foto, a saber: la integración de la puerta norte dentro de la fortaleza de los Ayala, que obligó a los villanoos a entrar a la ciudad pasando por el cementerio, sobre las tumbas de sus antepasados, lo que le granjeó al conde su antipatía.
La muralla en el lado oeste, contra la que en épocas de paz se construyeron vivviendas, ahora subsimida por ellas.
La muralla en el lado oeste, contra la que en épocas de paz se construyeron vivviendas, ahora subsimida por ellas.

Un siglo después, en 1520, el conde de Salvatierra de turno, nieto del anterior, que estaba comprometido con la causa comunera, por razones poco comprensibles ordenó a los vecinos de Salvatierra que preparasen a trescientos hombres bien equipados para sublevarse contra Carlos I y que no obedeciesen a la Hermandad de Álava. Sin embargo, el pueblo hizo caso omiso de las órdenes del conde y, en la guerra de las comunidades, la villa no fue contra el rey, sino contra su señor. El conde la cercó pero los habitantes la defendieron, gracias a lo cual pudo ser tomada por las tropas reales. El conde, vencido y hecho prisionero en Durana, fue despojado de cuanto poseía y la Salvatierra pasó a la corona real. En diciembre de 1523, Carlos I, en atención a los servicios prestados a su causa, le concedió el título de Leal Villa, destiuyó al último Don Pedro López de Ayala, “el comunero”, lo apresó y lo privó del título de conde. Este Don Pedro murió en cautiverio en 1524, sin que se sepa a ciencia cierta dónde ni en qué circunstancias.
salvatierra15
Solitaria ventana abierta sobre la muralla este. Algún galán haría el amor a la joven doncella asomada a la reja.

Mientras leo documentos y hago fotografías se me pasan las horas de la tarde descubriendo los bonitos callejones de esta importante plaza medieval. Pero aún me quedan por aprender trágicos sucesos. En una pequeña placita con seis copudos árboles que la mantienen en sombra me paro un momento y leo la historia sentado en un banco.
Pese al acuerdo redactado en la capitulación, Salvatierra no se libró inmediatamente del señorío, ya que un tal Don Atanasio, heredero de la casa de Ayala, lo reclamó para sí durante décadas; y sólo en 1569 se cerró por fin, a favor de la villa, el pleito librado durante cuarenta años. Pero lo peor no fue este largo aunque incruento pleito, sino la epidemia de peste que en aquella época hizo su presencia allí, y el simultáneo y devastador incendio que sobrevino en agosto de 1564, que ardió durante veinticuatro horas y asoló Salvatierra. Tan sólo un edificio civil quedó en pie: la conocida hoy como Casa de las viudas. Hubo que tapiar puertas y ventanas de ambas iglesias, tanto era el hedor que los cadáveres desprendías, y prohibióse también el paso de ganado; pero aun así la peste consiguió salir de las murallas, produciendo una mortandad del 40% de la población.
Ayuntamiento o Casa consistorial, en el lugar más alto del cerro, junto a la ermita.
Ayuntamiento o Casa consistorial, en el lugar más alto del cerro, junto a la ermita.

A diferencia de otros pueblos que he visitado con la moto en el norte de Álava, toda esta zona es mucho más castellana. Los esfuerzos de los sucesivos Lehendakaris por potenciar el vascuence no han dado aquí mucho resultado, pues apenas escucho a nadie hablarlo, salvo alguna madre joven y progre para dirigirse a sus hijos. Y es que durante siglos, desde la anexión por Castilla e incluso tal vez antes, el vasco fue abandonándose poco a poco por los habitantes de la región de forma voluntaria, al ser considerada una lengua burda e inculta. Respecto a las épocas, no hay ninguna fuente de inforrmación, y desde luego no lo son las conjeturas de la propaganda antiespañola, pero es de suponer que, habiendo sido romanizada cinco siglos y posteriormente dominada por Castilla cerca de un milenio, el vascuence debió quedar desplazado en época muy temprana. Lo que, en cualquier caso, es rotundamente falso es que dicho abandono fuera resultado de una prohibición (hasta quizá el franquismo). Una encuesta de 1970 daba sólo tres vascoparlantes en la llanada alavesa. La recuperación del vascuence es, por tanto, absolutamente artificial, de raíces políticas y no históricas, así como forzada es el nuevo nombre oficial de Salvatierra: Augurain, que quiere recuperar el de la mínima aldea que hubo en el mismo lugar hace un milenio. Pero ni siquiera Juan Perez de Lazárraga, escritor en vascuence, usa el nombre de Agurain.
El sol empieza a declinar. He pateado Salvatierra durante varias horas, he recorrido sus murallas por dentro y por fuera y me he asomado a las entreabiertas ventanas de viejos edificios, con su olor a oscuro, rancio y humedad. Estoy seguro de que muchos de esos sótanos y desvanes aún duermen, casi intactos, en la quietud y el silencio lleno de ecos de la edad media.
El interior de una de los palacios más viejos de Salvatierra, la casa de XXX
Interior de un viejo palacio de Salvatierra, la casa Begoña.

Como reflexión un poco al margen, a medida que voy conociendo Vasconia y su historia (muy sesgada, en general, por folletos y paneles de desinformación editados por las autoridades locales), me llaman la atención dos hechos: uno, que muchas localidades de Álava se muestran orgullosas y defiendan a capa y espada los fueros que les concedió Castilla al tiempo que reivindican su hermanaje con Navarra que no les concedió fuero alguno. Otro, que reclamen su total independencia como nación cuando la mayoría de sus argumentos se basan en una anterior pertenencia al reino de Navarra. Parecería mucho más lógico que reclamasen su reabsorción por la Comunidad Navarra.
Y aún se da otro fenómeno que, aparentemente casual, a poco que haya uno visitado diez pueblos en el País Vasco parece más bien obedecer a un proyecto: en casi todas las localidades existe, en pleno centro de los lugares históricos y con frecuencia junto al Ayuntamiento, bien visible y ocupando por regla general, contradictoriamente, casas que fueron palacios de títulos nobiliarios otorgados por Castilla, una herriko-taberna con la fachada llena de etxeras (las banderas con las que se pide el acercamiento de los presos vascos). Estas tabernas, que con frecuencia ofrecen poca variedad de pinchos y pobre calidad de servicio, han de estar subvencionadas por la causa; de otro modo, es difícil entender su supervivencia en lugares turísticos tan estratégicos, considerando la mucha competencia que hay aquí en el sector de la restauración.
Típica herriko taberna, propaganda camuflada de libertad de exprresón.
Típica herriko taberna, propaganda camuflada de libertad de exprresón.

Hoy día, Salvatierra es un pueblo que se deja conocer bien y que hace disfrutar al turista con su visita. Las dos majestuosas iglesias en sus extremos vigilan el trazado de bonitas calles, tranquilas (gracias a la sabia restriccion del tráfico intramuros) y bien cuidadas, llenas de formidables casas cuyas fachadas adornan soberbios escucos nobiliarios. Pequeñas plazoletas de diverso aspecto la alegran, y las olbeas de la calle Zapatería, construidas en tiempos con una altura suficiente para que pudiera pasar un jinete, le dan una gran autenticidad. El ayuntamiento y la antigua ermita relucen pintados de un color quizá algo escandaloso, y no falta una infinidad de bares y restaurantes, que ofrecen sobrada variedad de ambientes y decorados donde consumir los deliciosos pinchos de que Vasconia se enorgullece y el burbujeante chacolí que produce.

Regreso despacio hacia la puerta norte, donde dejé a Rosaura. A mitad de camino efectúo el ritual de Vasconia en dos ruedas: un chacolí y un pincho. Es un bonito y cálido bar, con mucha madera y luces amarillentas, cuyo amable camarero me sirve el vino en copa helada y el pincho en plato caliente. Continúo luego caminando hacia la iglesia de Santa María. La goma de mis botas rechina en los adoquines. Antes de subirmea la BMW echo un último vistazo a la que fuera Leal villa de Salvatierra, ahora sólo Agurain, despojada de su lealtad a Castilla. Aparece ya en sombras bajo el cielo aún azul, el sol iluminando ya sólo los recios muros de la fortaleza de Santa María.[:en]
Leyenda junto a la puerta norte
Legend by the North gate

Right after arriving to Salvatierra from Zalduendo (described in a previous chapter) and parking the motorbike inside the walled borough, I come across this curious though misleading legend exhibited by St Mary’s church, near the wall’s North gate; misleading because both narrated events (how the gate become part of Ayala’s palace, and how the comunero lost his earldom) happened within a century’s difference, not everyone knowing that Don Pedro López de Ayala el comunero in the second paragraph of the inscription is not the same as the Pedro López de Ayala mentioned first, but his grandson. Actually, there were a whole line of Pedro López de Ayala succeeding each other and inheriting Salvatierra’s rule along cc XVth and XVIth. So, trying to solve this little puzzle, I start ranging the Loyal Villa of Salvatierra.
Iglesia de Santa María, en el extremo norte de la villa.
Stronghold-Church of Saint Mary, at the borough’s North gate.

Each time I visit one of these villages I amuse myself with imagining its evolution, how it was founded, how it grew, which were the circumstances; and I fancy looking into the past with the eyes of my fantasy, imagining possible scenes of its history.
Going back to c. Ist bC, I see the Romans moving forward along Hispania and coming across a small shepherds’ settlement of basque natives on top of the knoll where now Salvatierra stands. These troops would report Rome of what they were exploring, and a few decades later Rome builds along such place the XXXIV route ab asturica burdigalam, connecting Astorga with Bordeaux. This is one of the mainstays for making Salvatierra become an important place in future. There is evidence of Romans remaining in the area as late as Vth c, aD. By then, this was the border between the Earldom of Vasconia and the visigotic Hispania.
Vista desde Salvatierra hacia las sierra del Aratz.
View from Salvatierra to Urquilla range and mount Aratz.

It might be that Navarre kings had founded, in 824 aD, a tiny village whereon the nomad shepherds’ settlement was, giving it the Basque name of Hagurahin (farewell place), and this village belonged to the crown of Navarre until 1200, when Alfonso VIII of Castile conquered and annexed it to his kingdom. Since then to the present (except for the past decades), the village has been Castilian.
As Castile wanted to strengthen its borders and stablish commerce roads between Rioja and the sea, a few decades after conquering Hagurahin, in 1265 to be precise, Alfonso X (the wise) founds on Hagurahin a new borough called Salvatierra, grants it the privileges and disposes that a protection wall should encircle it. Within the walls, it will be given the characteristic layout of other borouhs in the province, like Antoñana: three parallel long streets running N-S and connected y lanes, with a stronghold-church on each end.
Consequently, soon the borough would grow and prosper, turning into a strategic crossroads: the East-West route between Navarre and Astorga, and the North-South route between Rioja and the sea.
Iglesia fortaleza de San Martín, en el extremo sur del recinto amurallado.
Strnghold-church of Saint Martin, on the South end of the walls.

I stroll the place following the landmarks with historical information, strongly biased in an anti-Spanish way, that can be read on the most relevant places; and with such information I can, more or less, replay the events of this borough’s history.
La calle Mayor, que comunica intramuros las puertas Norte y Sur.
Mayor Street, linking the North and South gates.

Uno de los cantones que comunican la calle Mayor con la calle XXX
One of the lanes connecting Mayor and Begoña streets

In the year 1367, under domination of king Enrique de Trastámara, Salvatierra was invaded by a powerful army lead by the legitimate heir of Castile’s throne, Pedro the Ist, nicknamed “the cruel” by his enemies and “the righteous” by his followers. He marched on Salvatierra along with the armies of several allies from other nations, like the famous Black Prince, Earl of Lancaster, French, Navarre and even Jaime the IIIrd of Mallorca. Confronted by such a numerous army, Salvatierra gave in without battle.
Pedro the Ist wouldn’t outlive his own victory much longer, dying two years afterwards. His heir, Juan the Ist of Castile, bestowed Salvatierra as entailed estate onto Chancellor Ayala, who passed the privilege to his heirs for four generations. But the Villa de Salvatierra was never too fond of this Ayala lineage. It was the grandson of the Chancellor, Don Pedro López de Ayala, first Earl of Salvatierra, he under whose dominion, in 1440, the deeds narrated in the first picture’s legend took place: how he enclosed within his own fortress the Villa’s North gate, forcing his vassals to enter the town stepping on the graveyard’s tombs, where their ancestors laid.
East wall, used by the locals to build their houses against during peace times.
East wall, used by the population to build their houses against, during peace times.

One century later, in 1520, the third Earl of Salvatierra, grandson of the former, who was bond to the Comuneros (a movement opposing the king of Castile), commanded his vassals, the people of Salvatierra, to contribute with a levy of three hundred armed and well equipped men to rise up against Carlos the Ist, and told them to disobey any order coming from the Brotherhood of Álava. However, the people paid no heed to the Earl and, during the Comunidades war (between the king and the Comuneros)Salvatierra didn’t fight the king, but their lord. López de Ayala tried to siege the Villa, but its inhabitants defended it, so that it could be taken by the royal troops. The Earl, defeated and imprisoned in Durana, was stripped of his possessions and Salvatierra passed under the direct rule of the Crown. In December 1523, Carlos I, in reference to the provided support to his cause, rewarded Salvatierra with the title of Loyal, dismissed the last Pedro López de Ayala, arrested him and deprived him of his Earldom. This Don Pedro died captive during 1524, though there are some doubts as to the circumstances of his death.
salvatierra15
Lone window opened through the wall. Some gallant must have spoken love words to some maid behind the grill.

While reading and taking pictures I don’t feel the passing of time as I discover the nice alleys of this important medieval borough. Yet, some tragic events remain to be learnt. I stop for a while in a small square shaded by six thick trees and, sat on a bench, I read the history of Salvatierra while tasting a txacoli (white sparkling wine typical from Basque country) and a pincho.
Despite the surrender agreements, Salvatierra wouldn’t get rid off its serfdom so easily: some Don Atanasio of the Ayala lineage claimed the village as his due possession, and a lawsuit was held for over forty years until, in 1569, it was finally sentenced that Salvatierra was free. However, there were yet some other tragedies to undergo, much sadder by far. First the bubonic plague made its presence in the village, and then, in August 1564, a vast fire burnt it down during twenty four hours, leaving but ashes, the two churches and just one civil house, the now called “House of widows”. Both churches’ windows and doors had to be bricked up because of the stench from the corpses. Livestock commerce and traffic was forbidden across the walls. But the plague managed to come out the village, killing 40% of the population.
Ayuntamiento o Casa consistorial, en el lugar más alto del cerro, junto a la ermita.
City hall, at the topmost place of the hill.

In contrast with the villages I’m visiting in the North of Alava province, this region to the South is more alike Castile, though it belongs to the Basque country. You can hardly hear Basque spoken around here, despite all the trouble taken by the Basque governments for promoting this primitive language, called Euskera by the natives. Which is only normal, because for centuries since the South Álava was conquered by Castile–perhaps even before that–the Basque speakers slowly and willingly gave it up and switched to Castilian, as Euskera was considered gross and uncouth. There seems to be no trustworthy source–definitely, not the speculations of the anti-Spanish propaganda–regarding when that happened, but one can guess that, after five centuries coexisting with (and perhaps dominated by) the Romans, plus almost one millennium ruled by Castile, Basque language must have been neglected along the early middle ages. In a 1970 poll produced only three native Basque speakers in and around Vitoria. Thus, Basque revival in Álava turns out to be a totally artificial move, serving political aims rather than originating in historical roots. And so is the new official name of Salvatierra: Agurain, chosen to bestow the village with a Basque flavour that it has not had during the past nine centuries. Such a political decision, as proves the fact that not even Juan Perez de Lazárraga, Basque language poet and writer, ever used the word Agurain for naming Salvatierra.
Sun starts traveling down. I’ve been roaming along Salvatierra for hours now, I’ve walked all over its walls, inside and outside, and I’ve peeped into the shutters ajar of old buildings, smelling gloom, rank and damp. I believe that many of these basements still sleep untouched in the lethargy and the echoed silence of medieval times.
El interior de una de los palacios más viejos de Salvatierra, la casa de XXX
Inside of one of the oldest Salvatierra palaces, the House of Begoña

As a digression, as I get to know better the Basque country and its history–so biased, in general, by brainwashing pamphlets and “information” boards–I wonder about two facts: one, many (if not most of) towns in Álava show big pride in the regional laws granted (magnanimously) by the kings of Castile, while rejecting any cultural connection with Castile and reclaiming their belonging to Navarre, whose crown never granted them anything, except for ratifying those given by Castile. Two, they claim their total independence as a country whereas most of their aspirations are based on their having formerly belonged to Navarre. Wouldn’t it be much more logical to reclaim their inclusion within Navarra?
And there’s one more fact, seemingly chance, which I now believe takes its origin in a well thought project: in the heart of most villages and towns, often neighbouring the city hall and always at a visible place, there is some or other herriko-taberna (people’s tavern) showing onto the front several etxeras, the symbol used by those ETA (the Basque terrorist organization for independence) supporters who ask for the “rights” of ETA prisoners and demand them to be transfered to prisons nearby Basque country. These herriko tabernas, seldom offering good pinchos nor service, must needs be financed by the city councils supporting ETA, or otherwise they wouldn’t stand the competition in such privileged spots. Just a guess.
Típica herriko taberna, propaganda camuflada de libertad de exprresón.
Typical herriko taberna. Terrorist propaganda camouflaged as freedom of speech.

To day, Salvatierra is a nice borough easy to walk and know, and the tourists will sure enjoy their visit here. The two majestic churches at both ends watch the quiet streets (thanks to the wise and severe traffic restrictions), tidy and well taken care of, full of amazing houses and palaces whose fronts show superb coats of arms. A few small squares provide a medieval touch and the colonnades of Zapatería street, built so that a horseman can ride underneath, give it a noticeable authenticity. And, of course, there is no shortage of bars and restaurants offering more than enough variety of atmosphere and design, a tempting selection of tasty pinchos, which are the pride of the Basque country, and the regional sparkling wine called chacolí.

I walk slowly back to the North gate, where I left Rosaura. Halfway I perform my own Basque trail ritual: a chacolí and a pincho. It’s a nice warm pub, furnished in wood, whose kind barman serves the wine on a chilled glass and the pincho on a warmed up dish. When I’m done, I keep walking towards Saint Mary’s church. My shoes’ rubber grinds on the cobblestones. Before getting on the BMW I cast a last look to the once Loyal villa of Salvatierra, now simply Agurain, not loyal any more to Castile. The sun is setting, and just touches the sturdy walls of Saint Mary’s stronghold under the blue sky.[:]

Salvatierra county

.
El otoño se abre temprano camino en la llanada alavesa, tiñendo de siena las hojas de los árboles; pronto – el fin de semana menos pensado – montar en moto por estas tierras no será una experiencia tan placentera como ahora. Agarro una cazadora ligera y el casco jet, echo un vistazo al mapa, otro al cielo, y saco a Rosaura de paseo. Vamos a visitar la que, durante siglos, fuera Leal Villa de Salvatierra.
Pese a que algunas nubes altas enturbian el azul celeste y afean los colores de la tierra, el aire se siente tibio y agradable. Da gusto.
Doy un rodeo por el embalse de Ullibarri para entretenerme un poco con las ágiles y conocidas curvas de la carretera que lo bordea, frecuente ruta de domingueros y motoristas. La primera parada, obligada, la hago en el Etxe-Zuri, lugar de encuentro de unos y otros. Más que invitado me siento compelido a parar, cuando veo la media docena de motos en batería, como monturas en un pesebre, que se exhiben en el aparcamiento. Rosaura no desentona. Hay en la terraza un grupo de moteros carbonilla dándose un festín, y supongo que serán suyas las cabalgaduras de horquilla delantera invertida.
Un generoso pincho de tortilla y una sidra me sirven de almuerzo. Algunos rayos de sol que se cuelan por entre los altocúmulos me calientan el cuerpo y me reconfortan el alma. Me gusta la costumbre vascongada de pedir en la barra y sentarse luego a una mesa, sin la presión (ni el recargo) de los camareros de terraza. Aquí no hay dos precios, como en muchas otras partes de España. Te sirven, pagas, y tomas tu consumición donde te parezca.

Vista desde la iglesia de Ozaeta
Vista desde la iglesia de Ozaeta

Al acabar, monto y enfilo la carretera que discurre a lo largo del templado y fértil valle del Barrundia, protegido de los fríos vientos del norte por la sierra de Urquilla, moteado de aldeas entre los sembrados y las arboledas; aldeas que han perdido, en gran parte, su sabor de antaño a causa de las urbanizaciones que casi todas albergan: el amable clima y la cercanía a la capital hacen de este valle objetivo idóneo para una segunda vivienda. Los prados están llenos de sanas y ubérrimas vacas lecheras. Lástima que la industria láctea regional esté secuestrada por una política de inmersión cultural que les impide colocar mejor la rica y espumosa leche que aquí se produce.
Cautivado por el gallardo perfil de su iglesia sobre una loma hago una parada en Ozaeta. Bajo el pórtico, un grupo de chavales beben y charlan en español. A lo largo del costado sur de la iglesia está el típico bolatoki.
Unos kilómetros más adelante llego a Narbaiza (o Narvaja), y esta vez es la triste casona abandonada de algún indiano, junto a la carretera, lo que me hace detenerme. Cerrada la recia puerta de doble hoja, ajada y cenicienta la madera de ventanas y galerías, rotos algunos vidrios, llenas las paredes de desconchones, desdentado el alero de los tejados, es en verdad el nostálgico recordatorio de un tiempo que ha poco se ha ido para siempre. Un cartel de “se vende” rubrica el triste destino de estas construcciones que un día se erigieron con orgullo y quizá rebosaron de vida.
Vieja casona en venta de algún indiano, en Narvaja.
Vieja casona en venta de algún indiano, en Narvaja.

Me doy un paseo por la aldea, que parece como desierta; no se oye un ruido ni se mueve un matojo. Me gusta colarme en los pueblos cuando sestean porque el recogimiento en que se sumen me permite captar mejor su esencia y deja el campo abierto a mi imaginación. En un extremo de Narvaja se erige otro testigo de un pasado mucho más remoto y decadente aún: la casa semiarruinada de alguna noble familia, invadida por los yerbajos, hundida la techumbre a trozos, tuerta de celosías, exhibiendo aún en la fachada un escudo de armas que ya a nadie importa. El brillante canalón del alero atestigua el estéril esfuerzo de algún último heredero por evitar la ruina del edificio. En los valores de la vida moderna ya no hay lugar para estas mansiones; otras son las prioridades del dinero.
Decadencia de la nobleza.
Decadencia de la nobleza.

Entretanto, en otros rincones de la aldea, se hace acopio de leña para el invierno y se ponen a secar las ristras de pimientos en las ventanas que dan al sur.
Pilas de leña junto a un viejo caserío. Narvaja.
Pilas de leña junto a un viejo caserío. Narvaja.

Ristras de pimientos a secar.
Ristras de pimientos a secar.

Al doblar una esquina me encuentro con una tercera reliquia del pasado, este no tan remoto: el viejo letrero de una escuela en los tiempos de la dictadura, milagrosamente respetado por la fiebre antifranquista. No era yo tan niño cuando aún se daban clases en estos sobrios edificios que tan severísima educación cobijaron.
Vieja escuela de tiempos de la posguerra.
Vieja escuela de tiempos de la posguerra.

Atravesando un rastrojo me encuentro con esta curiosa construcción, que no sé lo que es. Parece un cruceiro gallego, pero lo que alberga no es una cruz. Cualquiera que fuese su objeto original, hoy día sólo sirve para que algún campesino guarezca las rejas de su arado.
Sierra de Urquillo desde Narbaiza.
Sierra de Urquillo desde Narbaiza.

Ya de regreso para continuar mi viaje, me doy cuenta de que he aparcado la moto cerca de una bonita y rica casona, seguramente rehabilitada. Me resulta curioso el contraste con las otras que he visto en la aldea. Estos son los nobles y los indianos de ahora. Cambian las modas y los estilos, pero donde hay buen gusto siempre se nota.
Casa en Narbaiza.
Casa en Narbaiza.

Comienza el sol a declinar hacia poniente y continúo yo mi camino hacia oriente. En esta época del año, es la mejor hora del día para la moto, y puedo incluso prescindir de la cazadora. Conduzco sin prisa, mirando todo a mi alrededor; llevo la visera levantada y la postura erquida, recibiendo de lleno el cálido aire de la tarde.

Desde Narbaiza ya destaca contra el cielo el maltrecho campanario, medio conquistado por la hiedra, de la iglesia en ruinas de Galarreta. Apenas queda nada más de ella, salvo el trozo de muro en que estaba la puerta, con una curiosa decoración que recuerda a la grecia antigua. Y como el hombre es un animal de rapiña, al torreón le faltan los sillares hasta media altura; es de suponer que, tras el derrumbe de la iglesia, los lugareños los saquearon para construir sus casas.
Meditando sobre estos viajes caigo en la cuenta del asombroso esfuerzo constructor de la Iglesia Católica: no hay en zona cristiana aldea, ciudad o población, por pequeña que sea, que no tenga su ermita o su parroquia, su catedral o su iglesia, cuando no son varias o muchas. Me admiran la energía, la tenacidad y constancia con que, durante ya dos milenios hace, se erigen estas construcciones, recias, duraderas y costosas. Sólo la fe o la ambición, mantenidos siglo tras siglo, pueden haber impulsado ese esfuerzo; que ha hecho, por cierto, de España lo que es y de los españoles lo que somos, nos guste o no.
Y antes de girar hacia el sur en busca de Salvatierra hago la última parada en este valle: Zalduendo, hito jacobeo de la ruta secundaria a Santiago y villa que fuera señorío de la casa de Oñate durante más de cuatro siglos, hasta el 1813. Un pueblo que, desde que dejo a Rosaura bajo el enorme árbol junto a la fuente, me cae bien por la afabilidad que muestran sus habitantes: todos me saludan, amistosos; cosa que resulta extraña en esta Vasconia de gente noble pero adusta. Tal vez sea porque Zalduendo es Castilla; o al menos así lo siente al visitante: no se escucha el vascuence por la calle, no hay etxeras en los balcones, y en el ayuntamiento ondea, junto a la inkurriña, la bandera rojigualda.
Me acerco hasta la iglesia, que está abierta porque dos señoras están de limpieza y cambiando las flores. Les pido permiso para asomarme y asienten con simpatía. Una de ellas entra en pos de mí y me ofrece encender las luces para que pueda contemplar mejor el retablo. Lo encuentro muy normalito, así que le miento cuando me pregunta qué me ha parecido. ¡Se la ve tan ufana!
Es un pueblo muy cuidado, de bonitas casas tradicionales y bien restauradas, donde no veo ninguna que ponga la nota discordante. Destaca en el núcleo central el palacio de Lazárraga que, con su impresionante y algo sobrecargado escudo de armas, hace de museo local. Por último, entro al bar y entablo charla con la dueña. Tienen la prensa de Navarra y me explica: es que estamos junto al límite provincial. Pido una Cocacola. Se está bien allí, leyendo el periódico; ha salido el sol un momento y entra alegre por el amplio ventanal.
Es hora de seguir ruta, así que vuelvo a la fuente, monto en la BMW y me encamino al último punto de mi itinerario: Salvatierra. Pero de eso hablaré en el próximo capítulo.
..
Fall makes an early way into the Álava plain, tinging the trees with sienna shades; soon – any of these weekends – riding a motorcycle around here won’t be so pleasurable as now. One ougth to make the best of the last warm days. So, I grab a light jacket and my jet helmet, take a look at the map, a glance at the sky, and Rosaura for a ride, east along the Cuadrilla de Salvatierra (cuadrilla being a group of villages, something like a county) with final destination the Loyal borough of Salvatierra.
It’s a fine day and, despite some high clouds covering the azur and toning down the landscape, the air feels tepid and pleasant.
I make a detour around Ullibarry reservoir for the fun of taking the bends of its skirting road, popular among Sunday drivers and bikers. The first must-stop is the Etxe-Zuri restaurant meet point. The sight of half a dozen motorcycles parked abreast, like horses in a manger, calls me to a halt. Rosaura is not out of place. There’s a group of bikers eating at a table in the terrace, whose are the racing bikes in the paking, I guess.
A fair pincho de tortilla and a glass of cider make my lunch. A few sunbeams breaking through the clouds warm my body and soothe my soul. I like the Basque ways: your order at the bar and then sit at a table, without the hassle (and the surcharge) of terrace waiters. There are no “terrace price” and “bar price” like in most of Spain. You’re served, you pay, then you eat wherever you see fit.
Vista desde la iglesia de Ozaeta
Sight from Ozaeta’s church

Once I’m done, I get on my BMW and head for the road running along the mild and fertile Barrundia valley, sheltered from the cold northly winds by the Urquilla range and spotted with boroughs among the pastures and groves; boroughs that lost their charm of yore as they’ve become residential areas of the capital: with a gentle climate and neighbouring Vitoria, this valley is suitable for a second home. There are plenty of sound and productive milk cows in these fields. Pity that the Basque dairy industry is kidnapped by a cultural immersion policy that hampers a better market for the rich and foamy milk produced here.
Attracted by the fine profile of a church on a hillock, I make a halt in Ozaeta. A group of youngsters drink and talk in Spanish under the church’s portico, and along its south side, under a colonnated hallway I find the customary bolatoki.
A few kilometres further I come to Narbaiza (or Narvaja). What makes me stop this time is the withered look, by the road, of an abandoned house of some indiano (the Spaniards who made good in the Americas during XIXth and XXth centuries). Locked the sturdy door, worn out and ashy the wood of windows and balconies, broken some panes, stripped off the walls, untiled the roof eaves – it’s certainly the nostalgic reminder of a time gone forever. On its side, a sign saying “for sale” certifies the sad fate of these house, once built with pride and filled with life.
Vieja casona en venta de algún indiano, en Narvaja.
Old mansion for sale in Narvaja.

I take a stroll in the deserted looking borough; not a leave moves nor a sound can be heard. I like to steal into the napping villages because the quiet lets me better catch their essence, and lets my imagination free. In a corner of Narvaja stands another witness of a much further-off and decaying times: the half wrecked house of some nobleman, encroached upon by weed, the roof partly caved in, fallen the slatter shuters, yet showing upon the facade of stone an uncared for coat of arms. The shiny gutter in the front tells of the futile attempt by some last heir to prevent the utter ruin of the building. But in present day values there is no room any more for these palaces; money has different priorities now.
Decadencia de la nobleza.
Nobility decay.

Meanwhile, in some other places of the village, people pile up wood for the winter, and the strings of red pepper are set to dry on the south windows.
Pilas de leña junto a un viejo caserío. Narvaja.
Wood piles by an old house. Narvaja.

Strings of red peper.
Strings of red peper.

Upon turning a corner I come across a third relic of the past, not so distant this time: the old sign of a national school during our last dictatorship, miraculously respected by the later anti-Franco frenzy. I wasn’t that young when classes were still taken within these sober buildings, which harboured such a rigid education system.
Vieja escuela de tiempos de la posguerra.
National school. After war times.

Beyond a stubble field I find this interesting old construction, whose purpose I ignore. Whichever it was, now it’s only good for sheltering a peasant’s ploughshare.
Sierra de Urquillo desde Narbaiza.
Urquillo range as swen from Narbaiza.

When I get back to keep my journey I realize that I parked Rosaura by a fine and rich house, probably restored. What a contrast it makes with the other two houses mentioned! These are the noblemen of modern times. Fashion and style change along time, but there is always people with a good taste.
Casa en Narbaiza.
House in Narbaiza.

Sun starts its way down to westerly and I retake my way to easterly. Now is the best hour for biking this time of the year, and I can even do without the jacket. I ride rushless, watching all around me; the trunk erect, the helmet’s visor lifted, taking all the warm air of the afternoon.
From Narbaiza one can already see the battered bell tower of Galarreta‘s church remains, standing out, won over by the ivy. Almost nothing else is left except the wall which held the gate, with an interesting decoration reminding of ancient Greece. And, as such is mankind, the tower has been pillaged the ashlars by the locals for building their houses. Who cares about historical remains in Spain?
Pondering these weekend breaks of mine I realize the astonishing construction vigour of the Catholic Church: in Christian land there is no village or town, city or borough, however small, lacking a church or cathedral, chapel or shrine. I’m amazed by the energy and perseverance with which such sturd constructions are erected since two thousand years, despite the cost. Only faith or ambition, kept for centuries in a row, may have powered such spirit; which, by the way, has made Spain what it is now, and Spaniards what we’re now, like it or not.
And, right before turning south towards Salvatierra, I make a last stop in this valley: Zalduendo, standing upon a secondary route to Santiago, a borough that was for longer than four centuries feudal estate of the Oñate house, until 1813. Un borough that I fancy from the first moment, since I park Rosaura under the huge tree by the fountain: people are genial, and every person I come across say hi to me; which is rather unusual in this Basque country, whose people are usually courteous but sullen. But, despite belonging to Baskonia, Zalduendo is Castile, or so it feels: you can’t hear Basque spoken, nor see etxeras (logo-flags pro terrorist inmates’ rights), and the city hall shows the Spanish flag.
I go to the church, open by chance: two ladies are cleaning and changing the flowers. I step in and they smile to me, offering to switch on the lights for letting me better see the altarpiece. I find it quite standard, so I don’t tell the truth when they ask me how did I like it. They look so proud of it..!
Zalduendo is very tidy, with nice traditional houses finely refurbished, none of them clashing. The big palace of Lazárraga stands out in the middle, boasting a overelaborated coat of arms; it’s now the local museum.
Lastly I go to the bar and chat for a while with the owner about some trifles. I feel well here, reading the paper, the sun merrily shining through the window panes…
But it’s time to go. I go back to the fountain, get on my BMW and make for the last stop in my itinerary: Salvatierra. I’ll tell you about that in the next chapter.